In 2014 voters approved a $7.5 billion water bond, which included $2.7 billion for construction of new dams and reservoirs. Unfortunately, few projects are underway, or even being planned. 
Most business of the Legislature is conducted by committees. Committees have jurisdiction over specific policy areas, and usually have a Democratic chair and Republican vice chair. Most legislation must pass several committees before a final vote on the Assembly floor. This session, Assembly Speaker Rendon has appointed me to six standing committees.
Last week, the Governor introduced his proposed budget for the coming Fiscal Year. The final budget must be approved by the Legislature no later than June 15th, and must be signed into law by June 30th. The new 2023-2024 Fiscal Year begins July 1st.
On January 4, 80 Assemblymembers and 40 Senators returned to Sacramento for the 2023-2024 legislative session. Hundreds of bills will be introduced over the coming weeks.  Most won’t be controversial, and many will probably never become law.
California is increasingly unaffordable. We have the nation’s most expensive housing and the highest energy costs.  We must reform policies that increase costs and impose burdensome fees on every home built, including rental units, making it difficult or impossible to find a place for many to live. State energy policies that drive up electricity costs, and our highest-in-the-nation gas prices/taxes, need serious reform. Water is another problem. Bureaucratic hurdles blocking new dams must be revised.
Holiday celebrations began in the State Capitol in1869. Though the annual Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony in Washington DC is well-known, many may not be aware that a similar ceremony continues to take place each December in Sacramento at our State Capitol.
Bills passed by the Legislature and signed by the Governor usually go into effect on January 1st of the following year. For better or worse, here are just a few new laws that go into effect New Year’s Day:
On December 5th the Legislature met for a formal organizational session. The main purpose was to swear in members for the 2023-2024 session, which reconvenes on January 4th. Despite the day’s formalities, my Caucus introduced a package of bills to address many significant problems that are affecting all Californians.
California has 30% of the nation’s homeless and over half of its unsheltered homeless. $17 billion has been thrown at the problem, yet homeless numbers continue to grow. Between 2019 and 2022, the homeless population increased by over 22,000. We have become a national embarrassment.
As the Assemblymember for the new 75th Assembly district, I want to reach out and let you know how my office can be of assistance to you.  We are honored and excited to be able to represent you in Sacramento and we are here to be of assistance.